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Dynafit Titan Alpine Touring Boot Review

Gear Review: Dynafit Titan TF-X Alpine Touring Boot

MSRP: $759
Summary: The Dynafit Titan alpine touring boot is an versatile, burly, 4-buckle boot with both a walk mode and interchangeable soles. It’s a hard charging boot that easily outperforms many alpine boots. It’s the ideal quiver of one for tram laps, easy access backcountry, and single day freeride adventures.
Important: Dynafit no longer makes the Titan boot as of the 2014/15 North American winter season. You can still find these boots at many retailers for a screaming good deal.


The Dynafit Titan Alpine Touring Boot is an exceptional 4-buckle touring boot that skis like an alpine boot. It’s designed for skiing downhill, but it also has a decent walk mode – making it ideal for quick backcountry day trips, where a charging freeride boot is necessary.

Dynafit Titan Alpine Touring Boot

Outside Profile

Over several years of endless winters, I have been through two pairs of Dynafit Titans. They have proven to be a lightweight, versatile boot that performs well. They offer a bit of tourability for quick tours, boot packs, and ridge walks, but perform best when on the downhill. The Titans were my go to ski boot for cat skiing, easy access backcountry, tram laps, and mellow touring.

Let’s take a closer look:

Boot
The Dynafit Titan is a 4-buckle boot with a velcro power strap. The buckles are magnesium microadjust buckles that allow for easy adjustments that provide the perfect fit. The power strap could be upgraded too. The overlap shell and cuff are made of polyurethane making the boot a stiff, burly performer. The flex is around 120 to 130.

The stiff polyurethane and overlap cuff also means that when the boot is cold, it’s nearly impossible to get the boot onto your foot. While ideal to put on after sitting under the heater of your car on the ride to the trailhead or locker room, I absolutely hated the Dynafit Titan for any winter overnight trip.

Dynafit Titan Alpine Touring Boot

4-Buckle System

Dynafit Titan Alpine Touring Boot

Outside Profile

Dynafit Titan Alpine Touring Boot

Inside Profile

Dynafit Titan Alpine Touring Boot

Opened

Weight
The Titans weigh in at 2000 grams (size 27.5) for one boot. That equals 4.4 pounds. One of my Titans (size 28) weighed 4 lb, 11 oz. Dynafit also produced a Titan Ultralight boot that only weighed 3 lb, 13.7 oz. They were pricier, but had rave reviews.

Liners
The stock Dynafit Titan liners are heat moldable TF-X Thermo liners. They are not the same quality as Intuition Liners. They do last a few seasons, but are nothing exceptional. I found that the pull tabs rip out very quickly. The liners have a rubberized sole, which is nice for hut trips. They also offer a lacing system to cinch them up tight around your foot. I found the toe box to be of a good size to ensure I could wiggle my toes on those frigid days.

Dynafit Titan Alpine Touring Boot

Liner and Boot

Sole Blocks
After skiing on the dagger rocks of the Andes and Montana, one thing I really liked about these boots was the interchangeable sole blocks. The Dynafit Titan is one of the few touring boots that offered interchangeable soles. This means that after a season of shredding boot soles, Dynafit would send me new soles – no questions asked. In the pictures, you’ll note that the boots have grey ZZeus soles, vs the stock red Titan soles. I seem to go through boot soles faster than most people.

Dynafit Titan Alpine Touring Boot

Soles

I almost always opted to ski the Titans with the DynaGrip rubber soles, but the Dynafit Titans come with both ISO Touring and ISO Alpine sole blocks, meaning that an ambitious boot owner could regularly change between the two sets of interchangeable soles – rubber and DIN compatible. This sounds great, but I find the soles are a bit of a headache to change. It required changing 11 screws (6 on toe piece, 4 on heel piece, and 1 in the Tech Fitting on heel). Plus, the pieces often got stuck and needed a carefully placed hammer strike to dislodge them. It wasn’t something I wanted to do on a regular basis.

Dynafit Titan Alpine Touring Boot

Old and Worn Boot Soles

The rubber sole blocks are tech compatible with Dynafit’s Quick Step Toe fittings – a design that is supposed to make it easier to step into a tech toe piece. I always paired my Titans with Dynafit FT12s, Radicals, or Look XM bindings.

Walk/Ski Mode
The Dynafit Titan boots have a simple walk/ski mode. The switch is located on the back of the boot. Dynafit designed a flawless system that never got switched the wrong way and it never got stuck in the wrong position (unlike some other boot manufacturers). The Titans offer 30 degrees of cuff rotation and the forward lean could lock in at 15 or 21 degrees. This is decent, but it’s not something that I would want to walk around in all day. It does not even begin to compare to other touring boots on the market, which are often easier to walk in that mountaineering boots.

Dynafit Titan Alpine Touring Boot

Walk/Ski Mode

Overall, the Dynafit Titan Alpine Touring Boot was a stylish, worry free boot that performed great for many seasons. It’s too bad that Dynafit has discontinued such a versatile boot. Just like every ski boot, the Titans had quirks, but it was a hard charging boot that can easily outperform many alpine boots. It was at home just about anywhere.

Dynafit continues to make excellent products, so whenever possible, choose the snow leopard and get yourself on Dynafit gear.

Be sure to read WildSnow’s Dynafit Titan review.


Dynafit Titan Alpine Touring Boot Technical Specs

Shell Material – Polyurethane  Overlap Cuff
Lean Angle – 15 and 21 degrees
Buckles – 4 Magnesium, Microadjust
Power Strap – Velcro
Liner – Heat Moldable TF-X with laces
Walk Mode – Rear Toggle Lever, 30 degree rotation
Sole – Interchangeable DIN Compatible and DynaGrip Rubber Soles
Sole Length – 322 mm
Last – 102 mm
Binding Compatibility – Quick Step-In Tech Fittings or Alpine
Weight – 2000 grams/boot (size 27.5)


Here are some additional photos of the Dynafit Titan Boot: